Swap Your Boring Lawn Grass With Red Creeping Thyme, Grows 3 inch Tall Max, Requires no Mowing, Lovely Lemony Scent, Can Repel Mosquitoes, Grows All Y

Monday 24th of October 2022

Swap Your Boring Lawn Grass With Red Creeping Thyme, Grows 3 inch Tall Max, Requires no Mowing, Lovely Lemony Scent, Can Repel Mosquitoes, Grows All Year Long, Better For Local Biodiversity.

Social Media Says

Serious question, does an HOA actually do anything beneficial or class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/what">what are the perks of having one? class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/I">I just see class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/people">people talk about the class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/ridiculous">ridiculous rules they push.
Nothing says Freedom more than class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/a">a HOA.
Same! Im in FL and if you sneeze in the wrong direction, class="u-nolinkc" href="https://worldnewsinpictures.com/a">a letter is dropped off by drone.


What You Really Think

Lesson here, kids: Never, ever, ever buy a house in an HOA.

Story time. My mother in law lives in a retirement community with an HOA in Florida. They even dictate a small (5?) color pallet that you can only use to paint your house. One guy painted his house the original color when the house was built. Of course it wasn't one of the ones approved. Because rich old people in Florida have nothing to do but bitch about people. That guy had a shit ton of complaints, and HOA threatened him in some way. The guy tried to argue it was the original color, which should be approved. Every single argument was denied, and he had to pay someone to repaint the house for the 2nd time in about a month.

What is an HOA?

Same sentiment here.

Same guy that named red onions.

In the past, colors were not so precisely distinguished as they usually are in English today. Rather the major color words had broader meaning. For example, "orange" only recently became a common color word. Most things we call "orange" today would have been called "red" not too long ago. This is why orange hair is called "red"; it's a left-over from an older usage of "red". (Take a look at Anne of Green Gables some time. The title character's hair was "red as carrots," and the book is only a little over a century old.) "Blue" also had a broader meaning in the past. "Violets are blue" is a statement that many of us have a problem with today, but in the past, "blue" had a broader meaning. The name "blueberry" is similar. So, to modern eyes, perhaps a "red onion" is clearly not red. But in the past, when there were fewer commonly used color words, each with a broader meaning, there was no problem calling it "red". And the usage stuck. -u/iownakeytar.

I am a professional gardener and I swear to god that flower breeders are all color blind.

Same guy that named red grapes.

*Red cabbage has entered the chat* That shit is either purple or blackish. Unless you add some acid and get the anthocyanins to change their reflectivity, but that requires a very accurate dose to get red, most of the time straight to pink. E: I guess they can't go "pink". "Anthocyanins, also called anthocyans, are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that, depending on their pH, may appear red, purple, blue, or black" Certainly looks pink to me sometimes, but I guess pink is a shade or red? I dunno I'm done caring E2: I have a strong suspicion that if you mashed this creeping thyme and added lemon/lime juice it WOULD be red. Anthocyanins are in tons of shit.

> clearly hadn't heard of purple. Of ***what?!?!***.

You know, there's a theory that blue is the last color humans were able to see. Like a lot of the oldest stories will describe dark red or grey seas. There also is relatively less mention of the sky. They'll talk about the sun and clouds, stars etc. But not "clear blue sky". Not saying this is universally true. Just something I read that would actually make sense.

Yes .i have somehow gotten it and I can't get rid of it. I sparyed something to kill it off this year, but my guess is it will come back. :/.

English ivy kills trees learned that from all those highway signs in Georgia.

English ivy means more mosquitoes, ants, snakes, and rodents. Nothing good comes from it.

>My next door neighbour covered their backyard in English ivy which is an invasive species that kills the native plants and trees. And now it's creeping onto my property Its perfectly named then. All the apt characteristics are there.

While you're correct about avoiding invasive species (and particularly English Ivy which is the scourge of urban areas in North America), I'm going to repost my other comment here. My background is a degree in architecture with a focus in landscape architecture, so I'm not just talking out my ass here- though one definition of my field is "professionally-talking-out-your-ass"... --- You guys know there is a middle ground between native and invasive, right? ]In fact, they're not even describing the same thing.]() You can even have invasive native species! **Point is, not every non-native is a bad thing**, and yes they *can* improve the local biodiversity, bolster climactic hardiness for animals and pollinators in the face of climate change, and improve the quality of the landscaped environment. For example, most street trees that are approved for use in cities aren't natives- they're often sourced from around the world for desirable qualities such as drought hardiness, ease of maintenance, pretty appearance, etc. If they can grow naturally in your local area, they're called **native analogues**. That doesn't mean your entire city is going to be destroyed by a rogue Japanese Maple (or a creeping moss will destroy your prized petunias- native to South America, by the way) ! They're some of my favorite trees in the PNW, and believe it or not, they're from Asia. Landscaping would be pretty boring without native analogues, although that's a whole new discussion on water usage and xeriscaping. The best thing you can do is look up your planting zone and what species do well in it- natives being preferred, of course. ]Specifically, this creeping thyme is *not invasive*, though it can spread and needs occasional management just like grass](). In my desert zone, it hangs on but doesn't spread without specific watering during the summer. It's also great for pollinators (bees **LOVE** that shit) and requires less water than lawn, though it doesn't deal with heat *and* sun well. Mint that you grow in your garden? Very invasive and hard to eliminate.

Check your local universities extension services for native options.

Glad you said this! In the US white clover is an affordable and fast growing native ground cover that probably already exists in most yards!!

I was gonna say. This is a great pick if it's native to that area. A huge fuck up if it ain't. For everyone. I live kinda in the middle of bumfuck nowhere, and have maybe 8 gardening places within a 30 mile radius. They'll know flowers similar to this that are native and help local wildlife.

This is the best advice. I'm building a house in a forest and there's a lot of exposed soil right now. We've had people suggest we lay down grass but we don't love that idea. So we asked the people who run a sustainable farm and greenhouse and they said if we want it to go back to natural, just leave it alone and the remaining trees will do their thing.

Yeah so much this. The problem is that in some places nothing remotely like a lawn is native and people want that lawn look. I get that some of these are better than lawns but we need to get away from the very idea of a lawn.

Salt the ground just where it is creeping in.

The previous owner of our house planted English ivy and a bunch of other bullshit all over the yard. The best way to get rid of it is the most annoying way -- pulling it all out by the root.

My local land grant university extention site recommended I put English ivy in my backyard as a ground cover. I was fucking floored. I haven't followed that advice and am still baffled about how to take care of my bone-dry yard.

Preach brother. I've been fighting Chinese Privet, kudzu, and Golden Bamboo on my property for who knows how long. Please do not import plants or animals (I hate non-native fireants they are killing of my Horny Toads).

English ivy is just horrible. It is the Kudzu of western Washington.

Hijacking this comment to add that at least in the US many areas have native plant groups that focus on helping people create gardens that are both aesthetically pleasing and good for biodiversity. This will vary and can include non-profits, volunteer groups, nurseries and sometimes even state run programs. If you wanna do something like this I highly recommend doing a google search for your area and native gardens or see if your local nursery has any helpesources!

I commented something very similar the last time this was posted about 6 months ago. I easily got 1k upvotes.

Better for local biodiversity *results may vary depending upon location*.

This is valuable information. Do you know of a sort of equivalent that isn't invasive in the US? Preferably good for Texas? My dad has trouble maintaining the lawn and paying for lawncare is tough, and I don't live close enough to be able to regularly mow it, so something that grows like this and stops at a few inches, while needing little care would be great for him. Bonus points if it won't creep into his neighbor's lawn, but if not, there is a chance I can sell the neighbor on the idea of never having to mow again.

You guys know there is a middle ground between native and invasive, right? ]In fact, they're not even describing the same thing.]() You can even have invasive native species! **Point is, not every non-native is a bad thing**, and yes they *can* improve the local biodiversity, bolster climactic hardiness for animals and pollinators in the face of climate change, and improve the quality of the landscaped environment. For example, most street trees that are approved for use in cities aren't natives- they're often sourced from around the world for desirable qualities such as drought hardiness, ease of maintenance, pretty appearance, etc. If they can grow naturally in your local area, they're called **native analogues**. That doesn't mean your entire city is going to be destroyed by a rogue Japanese Maple (or a creeping moss will destroy your prized petunias- native to South America, by the way) ! They're some of my favorite trees in the PNW, and believe it or not, they're from Asia. Landscaping would be pretty boring without native analogues, although that's a whole new discussion on water usage and xeriscaping. The best thing you can do is look up your planting zone and what species do well in it- natives being preferred, of course. ]Specifically, this creeping thyme is *not invasive*, though it can spread and needs occasional management just like grass](). In my desert zone, it hangs on but doesn't spread without specific watering during the summer. It's also great for pollinators (bees **LOVE** that shit) and requires less water than lawn, though it doesn't deal with heat *and* sun well. Mint that you grow in your garden? Very invasive and hard to eliminate.

It's all good, it hasn't stopped you guys from bringing in invasive species before, why abandon tradition?

Pollinators still love the flowers and it creates a better ecosystem than lawn grass and doesn't turn grey in winter or drought. It's fairly woody and not nearly as aggressive as your average invasive plant to worry about. It doesn't produce large deep roots so if you want it gone from an area it wouldn't be difficult.

However it has naturalized and is non-invasive so its fine.

Solves the "You damn kids stay of my lawn!" problem too.

My mushroom patch is also a tripping hazard.

Thats just called natural selection bud!

Is it a water hog? Asking for us desert dwellers.

Plus be careful where you walk, you could walk on a bee, ouch!

I rolled my eyes so hard it hurt.

I would imagine the smell would get overbearing after some time. I like a bit of thyme in some dishes, but as a whole lawn, I don't know about that.

You dont, lol. Its really not a very good idea at all.

"Neighbors hate this one weird trick".

Yes, its a ground ivy. Will choke off the grass and kill it. Thats stuff is a pain in the ass to kill too.

Plague if you don't like it. Also try creeping Charlie.

Not to undermine the experiences of others here, but I'll ]link my other comment.]() It's actually more like mint or moss than an ivy, though some species of either family are very invasive. It depends on your zone- it shouldn't ever choke out well-established grass (quite the opposite in my experience), but it can be hardier in areas where grass struggles. It's not considered invasive, and can be managed similarly to grass- it doesn't need to be mowed, but occasionally trimmed. It won't run away on you, and an edging strip would largely take care of it as it doesn't grow too deep.

That's why my back yard is clover. Even when it's "overgrown" it's not high. I mow it once or twice a year if I just want a neater look.

It will require back weeding.

Creeping thyme is actually not invasive. Some people are confused on the definition of invasive. Here is the meriam-webster dictionary. >1 : tending to spread especially in a quick or aggressive manner: such as a of a non-native organism : growing and dispersing easily usually to the detriment of native species and ecosystems Every other definition has the same jist. An invasive species has to be non native AND harmful to the ecosystem. Creeping thyme is easily managable and not harmful.

Creeping thyme is not invasive. Only takes a quick Google search to educate yourself.

Your neigbours lawn is also an invasive species.

Yes they do. And seeing how regular carpet grass has no flowers, it would be a world of difference to the insects.

Can't speak for thyme, but bees love my creeping rosemary.

I laughed too hard at this.

It's best to mix it with grass in high traffic areas. I did this with clover.

That's why I want reseed my lawn with crabgrass. It stays green with almost no water and is resilient as hell.

That and it can outcompete most weeds (especially if you are mowing) there is a reason no one does this.

If this is the species I bought, you can walk on it.

Besides walkin on the lawn to mow the grass when is the lawn wakked on otherwise unless youv got kids runnin around probably no grass walkabouts.

If they keep dying off, self solving problem.

Could it be...? Could it really be...? A REPOST BOT??

Yeah, it's invasive AF.

I see Zone 3 has entered the chat!

I looked it up, the flowers can range from pink to purple. There is a huge range of hues that creeping thyme can have.

I've seen this posted about half a dozen times, all with tens of thousands of upvotes - and hundreds of comments stating why it's a bad idea to get them. But noooooo... People upvote because "no mow, pretty color, good plant!".

There are also many grass species native to basically everywhere. Unfortunately, turf grasses and whatnot give grass a bad name. So many cool native grasses that people think are bad because they're grass!

A true agent of chaotic neutral.

Youre probly right on. I would love to do this. I live in a desert in eastern WA, and we got hot f'n summers like Vegas, but still have a winter season. So I want to know from the OP, if it could survive a winter with many many sub-freezing temps, and snowfall multiple days a year with snow that be sticky and stick around a little while?

I found ]this post](/NoLawns/comments/o4inv2ed_creeping_thyme/) in r/NoLawns with the same content as the current post. --- ^( this comment was written by a bot. beep boop ) ^(feel welcome to respond 'Bad bot'/'Good bot', it's useful feedback.) ^]github]() ^ ^]Rank]().

Your shit is pink?

First time Ive seen it.

Oh great this comment again. How original ranch.

Damn I would love that but I have a huge shade tree covering most of my front yard, I can't get grass to grow but would love a shade with some sun friendly draught tolerant plant I could use so I don't just have a patch of dirt.

Nah I think ]this is probably the actual source. ]().

Ah yes the fungus that looks like purple flowers. Why do people have to hate on literally everything?

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